Day's Eye

Here in Western Australia, after the first rains of the wet season, hundreds of gorgeous, bright daisies pop up everywhere. Their colours range from light yellows to sun yellow, salmon pink to almost black.

A bit of a background for the name – daisy. The word comes from the phrase ‘day’s eye’ as they bloom only during the day, closing their pretty little faces to the night.

The daisy has a history heavily entrenched in Roman, Celtic and even Christian folklore and religion. For instance, daisy flowers are frequently left at church memorials and used in church flower arrangements. The main symbolic properties of the daisy include:

  • Innocence: The Celts believed that the spirit of still born babies were transformed into Daisies. They place the innocence of a child into a beautiful flower, and the Daisy still upholds this symbolism to this day.
  • Purity: Similar to innocence, it is said that daisies first grew from the tears of the Virgin Mary, possibly the most pure essence from a Christian viewpoint.
  • Love: The Rose upholds love, but can lean towards passionate and romantic love. Daisy however represents loyalty, chivalry and of course purity when given as a declaration of love.’

 

This information taken from floristscompare.com.

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About Shemer

Author who loves reading, writing, horse riding, archery, books, dancing and many other things. Fulltime Soldier and part-time wildlife management student who loves to do adventurous things and explore the real world or books in her spare time.
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